The Difference Between Mango Wood and Sheesham Wood Furniture

When shopping for furniture, you may notice that there are two popular types of solid woods: mango and sheesham. Many people will wonder what’s the difference besides the obvious differences in the appearance of the woods. Before you decide on whether you should purchase mango or sheesham wood, consider the differences explained here.

Characteristics of Sheesham Wood

Sheesham Tree

Sheesham wood, or also known as Indian rosewood, is found in India. The trees grow for as long as 22 years, and they can reach to as much as 30 meters tall. The diameter of the trees can be as wide as 1.5 meters. These large trees produce wood that’s heavy and dense. It has superior strength, which makes it a high quality wood for fine furniture. Upon collection, the wood is polished, which leaves behind a smooth surface that is attractive. The natural marking of the wood makes every piece of furniture made from sheesham wood unique.  Many people who consider buying sheesham wood furniture pieces do so because it’s high quality and has a rich chestnut colour and rustic appearance.

Examples of Sheesham Wood Furniture

Three Drawer Bedside Table From Sheesham Wood

This three drawer bedside table is made of sheesham wood. As you can see in the image, it has a rich honey stain with natural Indian rosewood tree markings throughout. With its light and dark features, it complements many decors. It’s solid wood gives it that strong and durable appearance.

 

Sheesham Cube TV Video Cabinet

This sheesham cube TV video cabinet has the same rich honey finish with natural markings as the bedside table. With this image though, you can see how versatile the wood can be to make beautiful furniture pieces for your home. This cabinet not only has two shelves to place media units on, but it also has four drawers for hidden storage too. With the solid woods strength and resistance to damage, it makes it perfect to place a large television on without fear of its ability to endure the weight.

Characteristics of Mango Wood

Mango Tree

Mango wood comes from Southern Asia, although it’s believed to have originated in India. The trees grow to as tall as the Indian rosewood of 30 meters feet with a diameter of up to 1.5 meters.  Since this tree produces nutritious fruit (mangos) it is allowed to live fruit bearing life, and it’s not until it stops producing that it’s cut down and used for timber.

Mango wood is also strong and durable, but it has the added quality of being highly resistant to water. It’s not as heavy has sheesham wood, which is a benefit for those wishing to move furniture occasionally. People who choose mango wood for furniture like the greenish brown color and the course texture of it. They also admire the design work because since mango wood is cut and shaped easily, some manufacturers carve exquisite designs in the wood.

Examples of Solid Mango Wood Furniture

 Dakota Mango Three Drawer Bedside Table

This Dakota mango three drawer bedside table features mango wood in all its beauty. It’s been finished with a deep walnut colour, and as you can see from the image, it’s sturdy and highly attractive.

 

 

Mango Wood Plasma Media Unit

This plasma media unit made of mango wood is powerful enough to hold up a television that can be quite heavy. It boasts two drawers at each end to accommodate media supplies. The deep walnut colour will match most other furniture and décor in any room.

 

Deciding on Sheesham Wood or Mango Wood

Both of these woods are hardwoods and they are strong, durable and beautiful. However, if you want a smooth finished wood with natural marking in a chestnut colour, sheesham wood should be your choice. If you want solid wood furniture that is lighter, water resistant, and carved intricately, mango wood is what you should look for when shopping. By choosing either one, you’ll be pleased with the life you’ll get with them, so you can enjoy them for decades.

Images from:

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:MangoTree.jpeg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dalbergia_sissoo.jpg